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Sep 6, 2015 at 13:13 o\clock

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About one-third of adults have nasal allergies and all the misery that go along with them. Find out the most common triggers of allergic reactions, the best ways to treat your symptoms, and how to avoid allergens to stop allergy misery before it gets started.



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Asthma doesn't have to control your life. Learn more about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of asthma in both children and adults.



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A guide to controlling and managing your cholesterol, including the risks of high levels of bad cholesterol or LDL, risks of low HDL or good cholesterol, and medications.



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Everyone gets the sniffles. Find out how to stop colds, flu, and sinus infections before they get started, and get the skinny on traditional and natural remedies that really work.



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Our expert guide to diagnosing and treating depression, bipolar disorder, and postpartum depression.



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Your guide to heart disease, featuring expert advice, support, and patient perspectives on prevention, risks, symptoms, treatments, and surgery.



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Aug 22, 2015 at 05:41 o\clock

Study: 2 Million Exchange Enrollees Miss Out On Cost-Sharing Assistance

By Michelle Andrews

Fri, Aug 21 2015



More than 2 million people with coverage on the health insurance exchanges may be missing out on subsidies that could lower their deductibles, copayments and maximum out-of-pocket spending limits, according to a new analysis by Avalere Health.



Those who may be missing out are people with incomes between 100 and 250 percent of the federal poverty level ($11,770 to $29,425). Under the health law, people at those income levels are eligible for cost-sharing reductions that can substantially reduce their out-of-pocket costs. But theres a catch: the reductions are only available to people who buy a silver-level plan.



(Cost-sharing reductions are a different type of subsidy than the premium tax credits that are available to people with incomes up to 400 percent of the poverty level regardless of the type of plan they buy.)



In its analysis of exchange income data for those enrolled in the health insurancemarketplaces in 2015, Avalere found that 8.1 million individuals with this coverage had income levels that should have qualified them for cost-sharing reductions. But only 5.9 million received the reductions, which are automatically applied if people enroll in silver-level plans.



Some of those who were eligible probably bought cheaper bronze-level plans, says Elizabeth Carpenter, a vice president at Avalere.



Surveys show that people shop for plans based on premiums, Carpenter says. But if somebody forgoes cost-sharing reductions in order to pay a lower monthly premium and then has an unexpected accident or illness, their out-of-pocket exposure is likely to be higher.



Silver plans pay 70 percent of medical costs, on average, while bronze plans pay 60 percent.



Consumers with a silver plan are thus responsible for paying 30 percent of their medical costs in deductibles and copayments or coinsurance, up to a maximum of $6,600 for an individual and $13,200 for a family in 2015. Cost-sharing reduction subsidies reduce those out-of-pocket costs. People with incomes that are 150 percent of the federal poverty level or less are on the hook for no more than 6 percent of their costs (instead of 30 percent); those with incomes up to 200 percent of poverty pay no more than 13 percent; and those with incomes up to 250 percent pay 27 percent at most. Consumers who are eligible for cost-sharing reductions also have lower maximum out-of-pocket spending limits.



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Aug 17, 2015 at 04:27 o\clock

RSS Feeds - Health.com





About one-third of adults have nasal allergies and all the misery that go along with them. Find out the most common triggers of allergic reactions, the best ways to treat your symptoms, and how to avoid allergens to stop allergy misery before it gets started.



View the Feed Add this Feed









Asthma doesn't have to control your life. Learn more about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of asthma in both children and adults.



View the Feed Add this Feed









A guide to controlling and managing your cholesterol, including the risks of high levels of bad cholesterol or LDL, risks of low HDL or good cholesterol, and medications.



View the Feed Add this Feed









Everyone gets the sniffles. Find out how to stop colds, flu, and sinus infections before they get started, and get the skinny on traditional and natural remedies that really work.



View the Feed Add this Feed









Our expert guide to diagnosing and treating depression, bipolar disorder, and postpartum depression.



View the Feed Add this Feed







Your guide to heart disease, featuring expert advice, support, and patient perspectives on prevention, risks, symptoms, treatments, and surgery.



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Aug 12, 2015 at 01:54 o\clock

Frozen Donor Eggs May Lead to Fewer Births Than Fresh Ones

But statistics might not tell full story, experts say



WebMD News from HealthDay

By Randy Dotinga



HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Infertile women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) may be less likely to give birth if they use frozen eggs from donors instead of fresh donor eggs, a new study finds.

Use of frozen donor eggs is increasing, and some IVF centers have established frozen donor egg banks, the researchers said.

"Our research demonstrated that -- contrary to some claims made mostly by commercial interests -- frozen eggs offer a lower chance of pregnancy and delivery chance after IVF than fresh eggs," said study co-author Dr. Norbert Gleicher, medical director and chief scientist with the Center for Human Reproduction in New York City. "Patients should be made aware of this fact, before making a choice."

Until recently, fresh eggs, often from anonymous donors, were usually used for certain IVF procedures, said Gleicher, who is also president of the Foundation for Reproductive Medicine.

"Eggs from usually young, mostly anonymous egg donors are fertilized with partner sperm and transferred into the uterus of a woman, who usually no longer has her own eggs to work with," he explained.

But women often had to wait months for fresh eggs, while frozen eggs can be stored.

Dr. Rebecca Sokol, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said frozen egg banking gives patients access to a wider field of donors and provides greater flexibility for scheduling and coordination. She considers these "advantages that may outweigh slightly lower success rates for some patients."

The study results don't address the likelihood of births from eggs a woman freezes for her own later use.

The new study, published in the Aug. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, examined over 11,000 IVF procedures that used donor eggs in 2013. The numbers come from centers that perform 92 percent of all IVF procedures in the United States, the study authors said.

Twenty percent of the procedures used frozen eggs. Of the frozen-egg procedures that resulted in the transfer of an embryo into a woman desiring a child, 47 percent resulted in a live birth. The number of live births was 56 percent when fresh eggs were used.

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Aug 6, 2015 at 22:57 o\clock

Robots Built To Save Your Life

Hey, who wouldn't trust a robot with a baby? This victorious automaton, DRC-HUBO, took first place in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robotics Challenge June 6, 2015 in Pomona, California. 

Photo: 2015 Getty Images

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