inflatable boats

Mar 3, 2010 at 10:04 o\clock

An integrally constructed kayak paddle comprising

by: fulong   Keywords: power, paddler, boat

An improved kayak paddle for recreational or competitive paddling, which has handles affixed perpendicular to the shaft or shafts, which handles rotate on axles as the paddle is used, to reduce twisting of the wrists and other joints of the paddler and improve efficiency and comfort. The shape of the paddle blades is such that water falls off the corner of the blades and does not run down the shaft to wet the hands of the power paddler boat .

An integrally constructed kayak paddle comprising:

(a) a first paddle blade shaped with an acute angle or small radius at the lower interior corner thereof for assuring that water will collect at the lower interior corner and fall off from the corner instead of running down the shaft;

(b) a second paddle blade shaped with an acute angle or small radius at the lower interior corner thereof for assuring that water will collect at the lower interior corner and fall off from the corner instead of running down the shaft, oriented in the same plane;

(c) an upper shaft connecting the first paddle blade and the second paddle blade;

(d) a lower shaft connecting the first paddle blade and the second paddle blade;

(e) a handle to be held in the left hand of the power paddler boats which runs between and is connected to the upper shaft and lower shaft perpendicular to the axes of the shafts and resides on an axle which allows it to rotate in place as the paddle is used;

 

 

 

 

 

 

(f) a handle to be held in the right hand of the paddler which runs between and is connected to the upper shaft and lower shaft perpendicular to the axes of the shafts and resides on an axle which allows it to rotate in place as the paddle is used.

An integrally constructed kayak paddle comprising:

(a) a first paddle blade shaped with an acute angle or small radius at the lower interior corner thereof for assuring that water will collect at the lower interior corner and fall off from the corner instead of running down the shaft;

(b) a second paddle blade shaped with an acute angle or small radius at the lower interior corner thereof for assuring that water will collect at the lower interior corner and fall off from the corner instead of running down the shaft, oriented in the same plane;

(c) a shaft connecting the first electric inflatable boat and the second paddle blade, which has a U-shaped or V-shaped cross section of varying dimensions, with the largest dimension being large enough to allow handles to be affixed to the sides thereof; and the smallest dimension being only large enough to provide adequate support for the paddle blades;

(d) a handle to be held in the left hand of the paddler which runs between and is connected to the upper and lower edges of the shaft perpendicular to the axis of the shaft and resides on an axle which allows it to rotate in place as the paddle is used;

(f) a handle to be held in the right hand of the paddler which runs between and is connected to the upper and lower edges of the shaft perpendicular to the axis of the shaft and resides on an axle which allows it to rotate in place as the paddle is used.

Kayak paddles have been known for many years. Such devices have consisted of a single elongated shaft and two flattened blade portions, which may be either integral with the shaft or attached thereto. On some paddles the blades are feathered, meaning the planes of the blades are oriented in perpendicular or nearly perpendicular relation to each other, while on non-feathered paddles the blades reside in the same plane. The paddle is usually made of some suitably rigid material such as wood, aluminum, plastic, or the like. Light weight and strength to resist the forces imposed upon them are important considerations in the manufacture of electric inflatable boats .

In using a traditional kayak paddle one grips the shaft with both hands, parallel to the longitudinal axis. The blade is inserted in the water near the side of the boat at a point in front of the user. The blade is then pulled backward approximately parallel to the boat, by backward pressure exerted through the hand closest to the blade in the water, while forward pressure is exerted through the other hand. When the blade has been pulled back to a point beside or just behind the user, it is removed from the water with an upward motion and the opposite blade is inserted in the water in front of the user. The sequence of motions is repeated, creating forces which propel the boat forward through the water. Subtle differences in the amount of force applied and the direction in which it is applied with each stroke are used to steer the boat and keep it on course.

As the sequence of motions is repeated, particularly with feathered blades, the paddle is twisted and rotated between insertions of blades in the water to optimize the angle for exertion of force. This causes the paddle to slip in the hands of the user, which can cause irritation and blistering, particularly in the area between the thumb and forefinger. It also forces the wrist and elbow to flex with each stroke, which causes stress in these joints. The overall result of the twisting and rotating of the power paddler boat is a gradual loss of efficiency in paddling as fatigue and soreness increase.

As noted above, both hands are placed on the shaft parallel with the longitudinal axis when using a traditional kayak paddle. There is no perpendicular handle as there would be with a typical canoe paddle. It is recognized that the perpendicular handle is of substantial assistance to the canoe paddler, allowing him to apply force more efficiently with each stroke.

On a few kayak paddles, two handles are set approximately perpendicular to the axis of the shaft. This gives the paddler something comparable to the perpendicular handle on a canoe paddle, allowing him to make more powerful and efficient strokes. This was a significant feature in U.S. Pat. No. 4,673,361 to Harvey, Jun. 16, 1987. However, since the handles on these kayak paddles are fixed, they do not reduce the amount of twisting and turning of the wrists required with each stroke.

When traditional kayak power paddler boats are used, water tends to run down the shaft from the blade that is elevated at a particular moment and wet the hands of the paddler. This is sometimes prevented by using drip rings made of rubber or similar materials, which encircle the paddle shaft and deflect the water. Drip rings are typically an extra feature and add weight to the paddle.

 

 

from:freepatentsonline


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